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Contemporary Clay: Quebec


  • Wall Space Gallery + Framing 358 Richmond Road Ottawa, ON, K2A 0E8 Canada (map)

Show dates: May 15-29, 2019

Artist Talk with Marney McDiarmid + Marianne Chenard: Sunday, May 26, 2-3pm

WALL SPACE GALLERY is excited to host Contemporary Clay: Quebec, an exhibition surveying the innovation and creativity happening within the fields of ceramics and contemporary art in the province of Quebec. Co-curated with Marianne Chenard and Erin Crowell, this collection features the sculptural and functional ceramic work of Sophie-Ève Adam, Marianne Chenard, Judith Dubord, and Yannick Potvin.

This collection will also run alongside a feature display of artist Marney McDiarmid's dinnerware series, inspired by the ecstatic sounds of Brazilian jazz music.

This show is in conjunction with the New Clay Conference, running May 24-26 in Ottawa.

Judith Dubord,  Serie Jardin Éphémère  partie deux (2017)  Judith Dubord is a glassworker and ceramist established in Saint-Jean-Port-Joli. In her current collection,  The story of an ephemeral garden , Dubord explores the relationship between clay, raw and fired, and plant matter. By expanding on these two organic materials, she creates sculptures that at once capture seemingly incongruous states of evolution and permanence. She is currently pursuing a research/creation project on the interweaving of media and matter. Her practice is intimately linked to poetry and to the ephemeral and impermanent nature of being. Dubord has earned a degree in Artistic Practice Studies from the University of Rimouski, a professional certification in ceramics from La Maison des Métiers d’Art in Quebec City, and completed course work in specialized glasswork at Espace VERRE in Montreal. Dubord says of her work,    “First and foremost, I am a glassworker and a ceramist. However, I am often also a weaver, a photographer, an author, an alchemist. My starting point is matter. I am attracted to matter because of its physicochemical properties and the opportunities of metamorphosis and alteration.  Plant invasions and mycological colonization, their causes and their consequences, are for me sources of observation and inspiration. Repetition, of form and gesture, becomes inducive of a state of receptiveness to the work being created. Then settles in a sense of intimacy leading to a feeling of collaboration with the matter.  I am attracted to processes that are complex and require a certain degree of know-how, such as torchworking, throwing clay, weaving. By performing these ancestral crafts, I feel I am carrying and passing along knowledge and expertise, an important role in this world.  Through my actions and observations, I dive into an emotional, autobiographical and intimate space. My work is a reflection of my relationship to others, my need to take root, my contrasts, and the ephemeral, transient nature of life itself. Through my work I contemplate light and joy, rooting and flying, and try to access yi-jing*.  I work in limited, evolutionary series, the previous object being the genesis of the next one. I bounce off a particular aspect of an object towards that of another. The series then becomes a whole, an incarnated witness of a step-by-step mutation. My approach is symptomatic of the non-choice that I claim.  *yi-jing: higher state of mind, supreme dimension of the soul”

Judith Dubord, Serie Jardin Éphémère partie deux (2017)

Judith Dubord is a glassworker and ceramist established in Saint-Jean-Port-Joli. In her current collection, The story of an ephemeral garden, Dubord explores the relationship between clay, raw and fired, and plant matter. By expanding on these two organic materials, she creates sculptures that at once capture seemingly incongruous states of evolution and permanence. She is currently pursuing a research/creation project on the interweaving of media and matter. Her practice is intimately linked to poetry and to the ephemeral and impermanent nature of being. Dubord has earned a degree in Artistic Practice Studies from the University of Rimouski, a professional certification in ceramics from La Maison des Métiers d’Art in Quebec City, and completed course work in specialized glasswork at Espace VERRE in Montreal. Dubord says of her work,

“First and foremost, I am a glassworker and a ceramist. However, I am often also a weaver, a photographer, an author, an alchemist. My starting point is matter. I am attracted to matter because of its physicochemical properties and the opportunities of metamorphosis and alteration.

Plant invasions and mycological colonization, their causes and their consequences, are for me sources of observation and inspiration. Repetition, of form and gesture, becomes inducive of a state of receptiveness to the work being created. Then settles in a sense of intimacy leading to a feeling of collaboration with the matter.

I am attracted to processes that are complex and require a certain degree of know-how, such as torchworking, throwing clay, weaving. By performing these ancestral crafts, I feel I am carrying and passing along knowledge and expertise, an important role in this world.

Through my actions and observations, I dive into an emotional, autobiographical and intimate space. My work is a reflection of my relationship to others, my need to take root, my contrasts, and the ephemeral, transient nature of life itself. Through my work I contemplate light and joy, rooting and flying, and try to access yi-jing*.

I work in limited, evolutionary series, the previous object being the genesis of the next one. I bounce off a particular aspect of an object towards that of another. The series then becomes a whole, an incarnated witness of a step-by-step mutation. My approach is symptomatic of the non-choice that I claim.

*yi-jing: higher state of mind, supreme dimension of the soul”

Sophie-Ève Adam,  Tableau    Sophie-Ève Adam studied ceramics at the Centre de céramique Bonsecours in Montreal. Her artistic research, alternating between sculpture and vessels, prompted her to follow several advanced workshops with renowned artists such: Patrick Rollet, Claude Champy, Jeff Shapiro, Heidi McKenzie and Scott Barnim. She received several awards, including the Prix des collectionneurs de céramique du Québec in 2010. She was also a finalist for the Prix François-Houdé four times and obtained her first solo exhibition at the gallery of the Centre de céramique Bonsecours in 2012. She lives and works in Montreal.  The  Tableau  Series displayed are freestanding paintings inspired by diverse architectural elements; wall, entablature, pillar, as well as diverse buildings and structures.

Sophie-Ève Adam, Tableau

Sophie-Ève Adam studied ceramics at the Centre de céramique Bonsecours in Montreal. Her artistic research, alternating between sculpture and vessels, prompted her to follow several advanced workshops with renowned artists such: Patrick Rollet, Claude Champy, Jeff Shapiro, Heidi McKenzie and Scott Barnim. She received several awards, including the Prix des collectionneurs de céramique du Québec in 2010. She was also a finalist for the Prix François-Houdé four times and obtained her first solo exhibition at the gallery of the Centre de céramique Bonsecours in 2012. She lives and works in Montreal.

The Tableau Series displayed are freestanding paintings inspired by diverse architectural elements; wall, entablature, pillar, as well as diverse buildings and structures.

Marianne Chenard,  Iceform II   Marianne Chenard is a ceramist and visual artist. Her artistic approach reflects her interest in Canadian history, its landscapes, its status as a Nordic country, and the associated clichés and themes that emerge as much in the forms she reinterprets as in the personal imagery she develops. These lend a remarkable consistency to her two creative universes: in situ installations and functional ware. Marianne’s practice is also noted for its exploration of various technical treatments of clay surfaces. Her work has been featured in solo and group exhibitions in Quebec, Canada, and France. She has taken part in several artist residences, with Medalta in Albert and the Maison des Métiers d’Art in Quebec City, among others, and has received an honourable mention from the Prix François-Houdé du Conseil des Métiers d’Art du Quebec and frequently offers specialized training in image transfer techniques. Marianne holds a BFA from Emily Carr University of Art + Design in Vancouver. Originally from Rimouski, she now lives and works in Montreal. Chenard speaks to her practice in her statement:  The word “souvenir” in French carries two meanings. One is similar to the English definition as something that serves as a reminder; an object, a collectible, a photograph. The second speaks to the action of remembering: the survival in memory of a sensation, an impression, an idea; an awareness of a past event.  My art practice articulates itself around interest in how our connection to the environment is shaped through our personal and collective memories. My works reveal sensitivities to the notion of perception around history, place, memory and absence, and is strongly influenced by an exploration of nature. I use various printmaking techniques on clay and ceramic processes to create sculptures that illustrate fictional but realistic landscapes through imagery, form and contrast of material. I use porcelain, a material with strong historical implications and properties, that is delicate and indestructible at once and which, when fired, becomes an archival artifact. Exhibiting a strong contrast between fragility and permanence, my work explores the indefinite line of what is imagined versus what is actually experienced and the construction of memories.

Marianne Chenard, Iceform II

Marianne Chenard is a ceramist and visual artist. Her artistic approach reflects her interest in Canadian history, its landscapes, its status as a Nordic country, and the associated clichés and themes that emerge as much in the forms she reinterprets as in the personal imagery she develops. These lend a remarkable consistency to her two creative universes: in situ installations and functional ware. Marianne’s practice is also noted for its exploration of various technical treatments of clay surfaces. Her work has been featured in solo and group exhibitions in Quebec, Canada, and France. She has taken part in several artist residences, with Medalta in Albert and the Maison des Métiers d’Art in Quebec City, among others, and has received an honourable mention from the Prix François-Houdé du Conseil des Métiers d’Art du Quebec and frequently offers specialized training in image transfer techniques. Marianne holds a BFA from Emily Carr University of Art + Design in Vancouver. Originally from Rimouski, she now lives and works in Montreal. Chenard speaks to her practice in her statement:

The word “souvenir” in French carries two meanings. One is similar to the English definition as something that serves as a reminder; an object, a collectible, a photograph. The second speaks to the action of remembering: the survival in memory of a sensation, an impression, an idea; an awareness of a past event.

My art practice articulates itself around interest in how our connection to the environment is shaped through our personal and collective memories. My works reveal sensitivities to the notion of perception around history, place, memory and absence, and is strongly influenced by an exploration of nature. I use various printmaking techniques on clay and ceramic processes to create sculptures that illustrate fictional but realistic landscapes through imagery, form and contrast of material. I use porcelain, a material with strong historical implications and properties, that is delicate and indestructible at once and which, when fired, becomes an archival artifact. Exhibiting a strong contrast between fragility and permanence, my work explores the indefinite line of what is imagined versus what is actually experienced and the construction of memories.

Yannick Potvin  Yannick Potvin is a multimedia artist pushing ceramic, installation, and new media into futuristic directions while growing from twentieth-century movements such pop art, and the “bad painting” canon-dismissing movement of the 1970s. Potvin works and exhibits across Quebec.

Yannick Potvin

Yannick Potvin is a multimedia artist pushing ceramic, installation, and new media into futuristic directions while growing from twentieth-century movements such pop art, and the “bad painting” canon-dismissing movement of the 1970s. Potvin works and exhibits across Quebec.

Earlier Event: May 15
Marney McDiarmid | Euphorbia
Later Event: May 22
ARTIST TALK: Crystal Beshara